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CODE FOR SUSTAINABLE HOMES

PART G WATER CALCS

DOMESTIC EPC’S FOR LANDLORDS & HOMEOWNERS

Myths about green home remodelling

November 1, 2019

Do you intend to make some remodelling in your home that will be beneficial to you and your surroundings? This article will help you unravel the myths surrounding renovations of this kind and help you figure out what you need and what it means to have an eco-home (and you'll probably be surprised to see how completely wrong they are).


Myth no. 1: The green home is more expensive.

The fact is that some green products are more expensive than conventional products but you have to look at this eco-house remodelling project in the long run. Put three "R's" at the centre of your renovation: reduce, reuse, recycle. Due to the increasing amount of construction and demolition waste, rescue facilities are popping up across the country. You can find amazing and quality things if you are open to reusing any material and you never know what valuables you may come across.

If you still aren’t a fan of reuse, here are some more suggestions on how greenhouse renovation can save you money:

Greenhouses are known for their energy and water efficiency, which automatically leads to lower utility bills and significant time savings.

Also, all local and state institutions certainly want you to go green and some even give you specific tax incentives to help you "get back on your feet".

Myth no. 2: Choose products that say "green," "natural" or "eco-friendly."

Incorrect. These three popular terms are almost completely unregulated. When it is claimed that something is natural or favourable to nature, it is recommended that companies make these claims precise (to explain what makes these products environmentally friendly), although this is often not the case. So do a thorough search and inquire when you decide to embark on a project with materials on which this is only indicated and has no more detailed qualifications.

Myth no. 3: Eco-friendly materials look ugly.

We know that a clean and natural aesthetic is not everyone's style, but these days there are options for every taste. Explore: from luxurious, modern or traditional to rustic - you're sure to find something for your home.

Myth no. 4: Everything needs to be replaced to be green.

This may be the biggest myth, and the opposite is true: the fewer things you replace, the more environmentally friendly you are. Conserve natural resources and reduce emissions from energy production and transportation needs - among other things. So, you always choose refinement instead of replacement. The only exceptions to this rule are the use of energy or water.

Myth no. 5: There are not many options for environmentally friendly building materials.

Incorrect! This may have been the case once, but today their use is flourishing. Each type of material you need has a green alternative (wool insulation, bark liner, eco flooring ...).


Myth no. 6: It's all about choosing the right products.

This myth is very similar to the myth under no. 4 – the point is not in buying things. In addition to reuse and refinement, your remodelling plans should also include design features that make space itself more efficient (shorter water lines, skylights).

It is important to note that even the location of your home device is important. For example, a significant amount of energy can be saved by placing the refrigerator out of direct sunlight, as well as providing enough air space around it to deflect heat from the environment.

Myth no. 7: Going green will make it harder to sell the house.

Although the green real estate sector is still in development, consumer demand is not, on the contrary. A 2011 Earth Advantage study found that, on average, new green homes are sold 8% more than non-certified green homes, and, also, resale prices of existing green homes were about 30% higher than classic ones.

Myth no. 8: The contractor I hire won't know what I'm talking about.

This is even partly true because surely some contractors will know everything about green buildings and others will have no idea. If you hire a contractor who does not know the landscape, you are likely to end up paying more until you direct that person to your path and plan. Even worse, in this way, you can jeopardize your desires if the contractor, by ignorance of the subject, prevents you from finding viable solutions that you hope to have. For all this, make sure you hire a professional who will not harm your green project in any way.

Myth no. 9: Greenhouse materials are not as durable or effective as conventional materials.

This is so wrong. If something distinguishes green materials, it is their durability and efficiency, even greater than that of conventional "original" material for which it is a substitute. For example, a wool rug can last over 50 years if properly nurtured, while synthetically has a shelf life of only 3-5 years. The list of examples like this is a long one, but you understand the point from this one.

Myth no. 10: Renovating and building a green home is just a fad.

Not. The demand for green is growing.

It is very encouraging information that more and more projects are done in green and that positive attitudes about this type of construction and renovation are only increasing, and it is predicted that this percentage will double in a few years.


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