EXTENSION AUDIT

GARAGE CONVERSION AUDIT

STRUCTURAL LOFT CONVERSION AUDIT

PRE-PURCHASE FEASABILITY CONSULTATION

TEMPORARY WORKS

STEEL WORK CONNECTIONS

SITE VISIT  

INTERIOR MINOR ALTERATIONS

CDM & ASSOCIATED REPORTS

HEALTH & SAFETY REPORTS 

3D MODELLING (from)

PROJECT MANAGEMENT  

SOIL INVESTIGATION REPORTS

AIR PRESSURE TESTING

SOUND TESTING

BUILDING CONTROL APPLICATIONS

AIR TIGHTNESS TESTING

SOUND INSULATION TESTING

PART F VENTILATION TESTING

RENEWABLE ENERGY ADVICE & INSTALL

ENERGY STATEMENTS

THERMOGRAPHIC SURVEYS & TESTING

CODE FOR SUSTAINABLE HOMES

PART G WATER CALCS

DOMESTIC EPC’S FOR LANDLORDS & HOMEOWNERS

Eco House

October 8, 2019

Today's buildings are undoubtedly a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions and effects almost as much as global warming. Eco House or Green House can be a great solution to this burning issue. It is a home that is energy efficient on its own, built from green or recycled material using alternative energy sources. The way the Eco House is designed tends to minimize the negative impact of buildings by increasing efficiency and moderation in the use of space for materials, energy, and development. The idea of eco-friendly design will make a significant contribution to restoring the balance of natural resources and therefore contributing to our health and the health of future generations.

In this context, we can talk about three key elements:

1. Environmental Sustainability: The house is designed to reduce greenhouse gases, saving water and energy and reducing waste from home construction and maintenance.

2. Social Sustainability / Universal Design: The house is usually designed to prevent injury by incorporating security features to protect against crime and to improve the sense of security, comfort, and flexibility of people in different stages of life, as well as children and people with reduced mobility.

3. Economic Sustainability: A home is carefully planned to save money during construction and throughout the life of the home. With a house like this, you will avoid costly renovations and reduce energy and water costs.

An important and often neglected aspect is the placement of the building itself. The myth is that the ideal ecological structure is set in the middle of the forest, and this is wrong for several reasons: such a structure can lure suburban sprawl, and increase the energy consumption required for transportation and lead to redundant auto emissions.

Energy efficiency throughout the life cycle of a building is the single most important objective of sustainable architecture. Architects use many different techniques to reduce the energy needs of buildings and increase their ability to capture or produce their energy. The most important and economical element of efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems is a well-insulated building. Nowadays, many revolutionary materials can change the whole process of building a house like this, and we will refer you to some of them:

Solar shingles

Forget about the huge solar panels that you barely manage to attach to the roof of your house. Solar roof shingles are small enough to fit seamlessly with traditional roof tiles. In addition to being eye-catching, they also have the function of solar panels and roof tiles and protect the roof by absorbing sunlight for energy use. And here comes the best part: they are cheaper than normal roofs, they are easier to install than traditional solar panels. Also, these tiles are perfect for roofs that are already under maintenance because they offer, in addition to all the energy and cost benefits, also protection against inclement weather.

Air-purifying wall coverings

Did you know that, in addition to air filters and special plants, properly "dressed" walls can affect the air quality in your home? Also, these products reduce energy consumption. Such paints absorb and permanently trap toxins that are usually present in closed air. Exposure to the ventilated area indicates that the toxin content of the air decreases in less than 72 hours when using one of these wall paints.


Tree bark

Not much is known that the bark of wood was used as a building material. Traditionally, the bark of wood and its chips are destroyed, but the fate of the building material has saved it. The bark is a very durable, economical and attractive option for siding and shingling, and is taken from trees that have already been cut. The absence of paint or stain means there’s never any chemical runoff.

Living roofs

These beautiful vegetated roofs, also known as green roofs, in addition to giving your home a great look and a whole new feel, vegetation can double the durability of a traditionally laid roof. The estimated lifespan of a green roof is 40 years (compared to 17 provided for a regular roof). Also, roofs like this are extremely energy efficient as the demand for air conditioning is reduced for months, but also in winter, they reduce heat loss through the roof of the building by up to 72%. And when it comes to insulation, it is also important to note the sound insulation they provide - sound penetration can be reduced by as much as 40-60 decibels. Plants living on green roofs, especially leafy plants and flowers, can capture air pollution and filter toxic gases from the air, thus reducing the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere. Water return is also significant - rainwater is retained on the green roof to keep plants flowing, rather than flowing into storm sewers. Live roofs can hold 70-90% of rainfall in summer and 24-40% in winter.

Structural Insulation Panels (SIPS)  

Structurally Insulated Panels (SIP) are one of the best-insulated building systems on the market. Because of its tight seal, SIPs are great for an eco-friendly home. An airtight home requires less energy for heating and cooling and allows better control of air quality. Up to 40% of home heat loss is due to air leakage and SIPs solve this problem. They also undoubtedly improve air quality.

Mushrooms

You probably won't take this seriously when you read it, but mushroom roots or mycelium can be used to make building materials that are stronger than concrete and more insulated than fibreglass and, above all, the mycelium grows without light, so its growth does not require an external energy source. Mycelium is an environmental insulation material is injected between the inner and outer walls. The material grows slowly and becomes so strong that the wall does not need another supporting structure.

Smart glass

Smart windows are glass or glazing whose light transmission properties change depending on how light or heat is applied. This glass becomes translucent in summer to block certain heat waves, and in winter it becomes transparent to let the warming rays enter. This will save a lot on heating and cooling, as you won’t need air conditioning or a stove, and you will also avoid the cost of installing light screens or shutters.

Bamboo

Bamboo is the best alternative to wood, and bamboo as a building material is supported by the fact that it regenerates and grows extremely fast. It can be harvested for construction purposes up to every 3 years, and this kind of construction is beneficial to the environment: forests regenerate faster and will continue to do so. It greatly improves air quality, the use of bamboo would increase the number of jobs, no pesticides are used for its growth and prevent its root system from storing huge amounts of water.

Bamboo is a viable alternative to tiles, plywood, boards, panelling and flooring, worktops and more. What is interesting is that in Hong Kong bamboo has been used for some time to build scaffolding from which to build a skyscraper, so you can deduce from this the durability of this eco-building material.

The only problem with bamboo is its distribution or its location. Currently, it only survives in a tropical climate and its delivery is very expensive.


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