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DOMESTIC EPC’S FOR LANDLORDS & HOMEOWNERS

Quarter-round and Shoe moulding guide

December 17, 2019

First of all, we will distinguish between Quarter-round and Shoe mouldings that line up in the corners of your floors. They are almost identical, so much so that in some cases they can be used interchangeably, but they also have their specific uses.

The quarter-round moulding is exactly as its name implies, one-quarter of the 'roll' - a 90° angle at the back, with a perfect quarter radius on the shown side. It perfectly fits corners or softens any 90° joint between the parquet or laminate floor and wall. The length that the quarter-round protrudes from the wall is the same as its height. It also comes in different sizes, making it even more suitable for a range of applications.


Shoe moulding is almost the same as a quarter round because it has the same 90° angle at the back, but instead of a perfect quarter radius, its profile is a little squat – when you look at shoe moulding on the side, you can see that its height is greater than the length that protrudes from the wall.


The reduced protrusion gives a little more floor space and gives the mat a more finished look. The main use of shoe moulding is to move along the intersection of the baseboard and floor. Its advantage is that it allows wooden joinery to hide floors that are not flat.


Both of these installations have both internal and external mitre for joining pieces of mouldings at corners. This requires you to cut the ends of the slats cut at 45 degrees to make 90-degree angles. Extreme precision without many measurements will be achieved with a manual mitre box and hand saw that you can buy very cheaply.



The method of placing these mouldings is different and depends on the explanations and instructions provided by the manufacturer. However, a common basic rule is that they are always attached to the wall, and never to the laminate or parquet itself, since this will ensure the free expansion and weighting of the flooring under the mouldings. Of course, you can attach the moulding to the wall in several different ways. If you do not want to drill the walls, you can seal the mouldings with silicone adhesive. If you use nails, make sure they are as thin as possible when making purchases, as the moulding can break in length.



In addition to these basic steps, it is a good idea to take some steps before installing mouldings.

For wood flooring mouldings, most carpenters like to finish long pieces before measuring, cutting and installing them, most often by applying lacquer. It will take some touch-up work after cutting, but it can be done with a brush. Ensure that the slats are clean and smooth by gently sanding them, and then carefully remove the sawdust with a cloth. Let the layer dry completely before proceeding with the installation.

If you decide to paint your mouldings, be sure to choose, preferably, the same type of wood like the one on the floor. Pine or other softwoods are good for painting, but they don't take stain very well.


When it comes to parquet flooring, it is always advisable to use wooden mouldings, but this is not the rule. With the good selection and careful placement, each material blends in and acts naturally.

Also, you do not have to use strips of the same material as the laminate. You can also install aluminium, PVC or wood mouldings on this type of floor. If you choose laminate strips, know that you will get a long-lasting, easy-to-maintain base. However, be aware that if the humidity is too high, both laminate and mouldings can start to swell the same as wood. Also, during the dry summer months, laminate flooring and mouldings can also be collected, so the humidifier is not used in the summer.


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